AI Super-Resolution Simulations

From Climate Science to Cosmology

February 23-25, 2022

Register Today

Registration open until Friday, January 28

about

Focus

AI Super-resolution simulations and their applications across fields, including cosmology,
climate and weather, biophysics and
turbulence/fluid dynamics in engineering and medicine.

Networking

formation of new collaborations and sharing ideas through the hybrid in-person/virtual format

DESCRIPTION

An emerging application of AI is super-resolution enhancement of numerical simulations in Physics and Engineering. Various AI methods, primarily Deep Learning are being combined with computational fluid dynamics, gravitational N-body and other traditional Physics solvers to radically increase simulation dynamic range and speed. These techniques are being developed in various fields, from medicine, engineering and biophysics through climate modeling to cosmology. The goal is to bring together domain experts who are interested in the use of Machine Learning to improve the resolution of numerical simulations. The aim is to enable cross-fertilization of ideas; we think this will be best achieved with presentations that are jargon-free and with free time to talk informally. 

Workshop format: hybrid in-person/virtual

Start time: Wed Feb 23 9:30 am EST

End time: Fri Feb 25 12:30 pm EST

Location: For those able to attend in person the venue will be the Cohon University Center, Carnegie Mellon Pittsburgh Campus. For those attending virtually, talks will be streamed through Zoom, with some social interaction and poster sessions using Spatial. More details will be provided soon.

Accommodation: If you are planning on coming to Pittsburgh, two nearby hotel suggestions are:  Mansions on Fifth and Wyndham Pittsburgh University Center 

 

Confirmed speakers so far

 

Shady Ahmed, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Oklahoma State University

Catherine Bouchard,  Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Université Laval

Tom Beucler, Institute of Earth Surface Dynamics,  University of Lausanne

Amir Barati Farimani, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Carnegie Mellon University

Kai Fukami,  Department of Mechanical Engineering, UC Los Angeles

Dorit Hammerling, Department of Applied Mathematics and Statistics, Colorado School of Mines

Pedram Hassanzadeh,  Department of Earth Environmental and Planetary Sciences, Rice University

Yin Li,  Center for Computational Astrophysics,     Simons Foundation

Claire Monteleoni, Computer Science Department, University of Colorado

Yueying Ni, Department of Physics, Carnegie Mellon University

Ryo Onishi, Global Scientific Information and Computing Center, Tokyo Institute of Technology  

Brant Robertson, Department of Astronomy, UC Santa Cruz

Yingkai Sha, Department of Earth, Ocean and Atmospheric Sciences, University of British Columbia

Karen Stengel,  Computer Science Department, University of Colorado

Francisco Villaescusa-Navarro, Center for Computational Astrophysics, Simons Foundation

Jian-Xun Wang,  Department of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering, University of  Notre Dame

 

Organizing committee

Shiladitya Bannerjee

Shiladitya Bannerjee

CMU Physics

Amir Farimani

Amir Farimani

CMU Mechanical Engineering

Rupert Croft

Rupert Croft

CMU Physics

Ben Moews

Ben Moews

CMU Physics

Tiziana Di Matteo

Tiziana Di Matteo

CMU Physics

John Urbanic

John Urbanic

Pittsburgh Supercomputing Center

Scott Dodelson

Scott Dodelson

CMU Physics

Venkat Viswanathan

Venkat Viswanathan

CMYU Mechanical Engineering